Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Besides Georgia, Russia's in a pissing row with Finland, Alaska and Greenland.

Top of the morning gents,

I'm betting none of ye knew that we've been chasing Russian aircraft back home all goddamn year.

Rusky fuckers have been zipping under our skirts Diomede and Pribilof and buzzing over top of Barrow so frequent that we're building a full scale big ass Coast Guard Naval Port.

Wake up fucks! The last time Barrow had a naval facility was during the Cold War with them Soviet Godless fucks: AKA NARL-naval arctic research laboratory.

We even shadow subhuman rusky dickweeds as they radar, sonar and topograph the open water Nordic highway commonly believed to be frozen year round.

Odd mythology to believe Vikings cruised the Earth for thousands of years--in ice breaking navies. Not. Rotten old Vinland maps show open poles, both north and south.

Just set the slaves on cruise control, rally ice free super highways, scrawg native slagger biscuit and pillage till yer dick hurts. Serious rally mish, more boners leave taller morons in yer wake. My great gramps always bragged about pushing the bottom outa some mongolian biscuit with labia lips top and bottom--not side by side. He swears that little beaver crotch pocket used to wink and blink at him after he come a load, drove it home, pulling out real quick to watch that big eyed beaver gag, convulse and chew cud like a blinking venus fly trap. I made that last part up.

Where was my line of thought, I got way too focused describing some of the weirdest pussy I've sucked, fucked and glued. Some pussies look a lot like a salamander in a taco with others looking like grilled cheese sandwich smashed on a wheelchair wrapped in Depends.

Back to my thesis of spectacular navy vessels looming over my day time daydreams and hallucinationatory chink strolls. Barrow is the ugly native troll under the bridge and thus, the toll takers. Barrow is like Kotzebue Long Range Radar Site, but also equipped with SUPER fancy submarine chit chat machines.

All fucking summer my drunken dog walks and 4 wheeler rally mishes have had large destroyers barely obscured by clouds and ghostly giant carriers reminiscent of seeing three ships come saling in on Christmas Day in the morning.

Wake and bake niggers. My beach hike escapes for some smoking, drinking and shooting now got monstrous ice breakers and submarine killers puttering about yonder Ukpeagvik ocean. Gnarley equipment assisted by repeated sattelite flyovers and additional lethal compliments of Boeing's E3A AWACS radome jets. Now that's fucking sea, air and land superiority fuck all.

According my crooks overseas, them Rusky buttfuckers are also jerking around causing a ruckus with Finland, our mates bordering Russia on the opposite site from Alaska.

You twits really ought to hang up yer fucking guns and cuffs and go back to college, old farts get free tuition and them college girls can pack more meat in their mouth than they can pack in their cooter. Gotta hack a loocher on yer own dry dick to pull out of a frog's water tight vagina and unfold them super glued dry labia wraps before they tear off half yer donkey beard.

Yup, prolific shite. Yer author on drugs is also a goat milker, so fuck ye.

You boys are all more than just fucking Alaskans, yer also some other genetic stock like some German Hitler fucks or yer gramps walked like a Norwegian. Well besides a goat fucker or gunslinger or squaw boy, yer Alaskans AND something else. Something really ugly, but God loves ye. I'm trying.

Ye see, God don't like Russians. Their gay Islamic onion domed government buildings make me retch quicker'n smelling sodomy in a sod house.

Hey, deal's a deal. No do-overs or take-backs. We done stole Alaska fair and square.

Just gotta figure out what to do with all them horny aborigines. I'm sure you European rapists will figure something out.

Stay nasty.

---

Russia admits July border violation by one of its helicopters

Russia has admitted that one of the country's frontier guard service helicopters flew into Finnish airspace over the near Nuijamaa in late July.

A spokesman from the Vyborg area frontier guard stated that the illegal border crossing was a result of a navigational error by the helicopter crew at a point where the border-zone makes a sharp curve.

Such things are apparently possible when flying by sight navigation at low altitudes.

Russia has issued a formal apology for the violation and the matter is officially closed.

A heavy MI-8 helicopter was spotted by several witnesses at around noon on July 28th in a place where it was not supposed to be. One border patrol also took pictures of the aircraft in flight.

It was apparently on the Finnish side for around five minutes, and the greatest extent of the incursion was roughly two kilometres from the border.


Helsingin Sanomat

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Arctic Cabinet Meeting Risks New Cold War for Oil (Update1)

By Theophilos Argitis

Aug. 26 (Bloomberg) -- Beneath the melting ice of the Arctic Ocean, the world's last great land grab is under way.

Global warming is opening the Northwest Passage that sailing ships sought 500 years ago, and some of the world's biggest oil reserves are becoming accessible under the polar sea. Russia, the U.S., Canada, Norway and Denmark are jockeying for territory in moves that could end up in clashing claims.

With an eye on asserting Canada's stake, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his cabinet will travel this week to the Arctic town of Inuvik, as the country completes its largest- ever military exercise in the region. The town, where the summer sun never sets, lies 4,100 kilometers (2,548 miles) from Ottawa.

``You have the recipe for trouble if there isn't real energy invested early to help resolve some of these issues,'' said Scott Borgerson, a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. ``You can envisage a future in which all the ice is gone, there is this wild-west environment in terms of lack of respect for whatever national law.''

Western nations are playing catch-up in laying claim to the Arctic. Russia, which planted a titanium flag on the Arctic seabed last year, already deploys strategic-bomber flights to patrol the region. It has also begun training troops for combat in the far north, where temperatures can drop to less than -57 degrees Celsius (-70 degrees Fahrenheit).

Georgia Parallel

If Arctic disputes come to a head, the divide between leaders in Moscow and the West may soon stretch beyond Georgia, where a war with Russia broke out this month over the breakaway region of South Ossetia.

``Events in Georgia should wake people up to what the Russians have been doing,'' said Rob Huebert, associate director of the University of Calgary's Center for Military and Strategic Studies. ``The northern developments are where they're going to get their next major source of petrol dollars and they're going to be very aggressive there.''

Canada is in the midst of its own military buildup in the Arctic Ocean, an area about the size of Russia. It has budgeted C$7.4 billion for Arctic ships, and its fighter jets regularly shadow Russian TU-95 bombers.

``We remind them we want to see their tail end, not their front-end,'' said Defense Minister Peter Mackay, 42, in a telephone interview from a military base in Alert, Nunavut, the world's northernmost inhabited place. ``The presence of Canadian forces is increasingly important to not just claim our sovereignty but exert it.''

Elections

The cabinet's trip, coming weeks before possible parliamentary elections, helps Harper, 49, project the image of a strong leader who fights for Canadians, said Norman Hillmer, a Carleton University professor in Ottawa specializing in Canada's foreign policy.

Harper is slated to arrive today in Inuvik, population about 3,500, where he'll stay at the MacKenzie Hotel opposite Canada's northernmost traffic light. Before leaving Ottawa, he unveiled a project to map energy and minerals in the region, telling a news conference the known resources are ``merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg.''

On Aug. 28, he'll meet at the hotel with his 13-member core cabinet.

Tomorrow, Harper crosses the treeless permafrost on a Hercules C130 military transport plane to tour Tuktoyaktuk, an Inuit community on the shores of the Arctic Ocean. The next day he makes an announcement on national security.

``Every so often, Canadians get seized of the north,'' said Hillmer. ``It comes to the front of our minds mostly when it seems threatened. It seems to be threatened at the moment.''

Overlapping Claims

The five Arctic nations have sought to ease the tension. At a two-day summit in Greenland in May, they agreed to work for an ``orderly settlement'' of any conflicting claims.

Canadian Natural Resource Minister Gary Lunn said at a Madrid conference in July that overlapping claims ``will be minimal,'' while Margaret Hayes, director of the State Department's Bureau of Oceans, Environment and Science, told reporters Aug. 11 that Russia's territorial assertions aren't ``intruding'' on U.S. interests.

``I don't think we're ever going to have a battle up in the Arctic, at least I hope not,'' Paul Cellucci, a former U.S. ambassador to Canada, said in a telephone interview. ``I think these determinations are going to have to be made in some sort of a legal framework and I think ultimately the Russians will understand that as well.''

`Oil and Gas'

Under the United Nations Law of the Sea convention, the economic rights of countries on the Arctic Ocean extend 320 kilometers from their shores. They can base claims on the reach of their continental shelf, creating the potential for overlapping stakes.

``This is an instance when science has tangible geopolitical consequences,'' Mikhail Flint, said deputy director of ecology at the Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences. ``In this case everything is related to oil and gas.''

The combination of rising temperatures and soaring oil prices is fueling the urgency of the land rush.

The region is warming about twice as fast as the global average, the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in a report last year. The fabled Northwest Passage, a shortcut between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, opened this year for only the second time in recorded history.

Retreating Ice

The retreat of the ice may allow oil companies to explore the deepest parts of the Arctic Ocean year-round as petroleum- rich nations in the Middle East, Latin America and the former Soviet Union restrict access to reserves.

The Arctic may hold 90 billion barrels of oil, more than the proven reserves of Nigeria, Kazakhstan and Mexico combined, and enough to supply the U.S. for more than a decade, the U.S. Geological Survey said in July.

The Russians aren't the only worry for Canada. The U.S. contests Canada's sovereignty over the Northwest Passage, which could shrink travel between Shanghai and New Jersey by 7,000 kilometers, and the two are disputing a sliver of water just north of Alaska.

Building a military and civilian presence in the region is key to Canadian control of its Arctic resources, officials say.

``I don't believe we should be out there assuming the others don't want to cooperate,'' said former Prime Minister Paul Martin, 69, Harper's predecessor, in a telephone interview. ``But if that occurs, then we should be able to respond very quickly.''

To contact the reporter on this story: Theophilos Argitis in Inuvik, Northwest Territories at targitis@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated: August 26, 2008 13:36 EDT

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EU prepares Arctic action plan as ice melts[fr][de]

Published: Thursday 11 September 2008

EU Fisheries and Maritime Affairs Commissioner Joe Borg announced that Brussels is preparing proposals to safeguard the Arctic, a region on the front line of global warming and increasingly at the centre of sovereignty conflicts. He was speaking at a three-day Arctic conference in Ilulissat, Greenland, which ended today (11 September).

The action plan will cover three broad fronts: measures aimed at safeguarding the Arctic and its ecosystem, promoting the sustainable use of resources and addressing "the broader question of governance," Borg said.

Speaking to EurActiv, a Commission spokesperson explained that the EU was not about to press for new international legislation for the Arctic, but rather for "enhanced cooperation between the interested parties". But he was careful not to rule out new legislation at a later stage.

"We are not convinced either that we need, or we don't need, new legislation" with respect to maritime routes, fishing and access to resources, he said. A clearer picture may emerge following an EU conference on the Arctic (scheduled to take place in Monaco on 9 November) and a Commission Communication on the Arctic Region to be published afterwards, he explained.

In fact, this is the first time that the EU has been invited to such a conference, organised by the Nordic Council of Ministers (Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway and Iceland). The EU's interest in the Arctic stems from the challenges of climate change as well as from new opportunities to draw upon the wealth of untapped natural resources in the region. The Union was represented in Ilulissat by Commissioner Borg, a vice president of the European Parliament and a French ambassador representing the EU Presidency.

Russia not the issue

Asked if the EU saw this as an occasion to respond to Russia's planting of its flag on the seabed of the North Pole, the Commission representative made clear that the conference was not a response to events, but rather a response to climate change.

Russia was represented at the conference by an ambassador-at-large, but Commission representatives left Greenland before he made his contribution and did not have bilateral contact with him.

Canada and US warn of possible conflict

Canadian Foreign Minister David Emerson recently expressed concern about illegal overflights of Canadian airspace by Russian jets, adding that his country treats such actions in the context of recent Russian actions in Georgia.

Similar concerns were expressed yesterday by a senior US coastguard commander. Speaking to the BBC, Rear Admiral Gene Brooks, in charge of the coastguard's vast Alaska region, appealed for a diplomatic deal to be struck, warning of a risk of conflict in the Arctic unless disputes over international borders are solved.

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